Doctoral Programs in Engineering

Environmental Engineering, Ph.D.

Tushar Sinha, Doctoral Graduate Coordinator
Contact: 361-593-3061

The Doctor of Philosophy degree in Environmental Engineering offered by the Department of Environmental Engineering at Texas A&M University-Kingsville prepares students for careers in research, teaching and environmental management. As environmental issues transcend media and geographic borders, it is increasingly important for the environmental professional to be able to address issues and derive solutions from a holistic basis. Students enrolled in the program are exposed to the fundamental principles, tools and applications in Environmental Systems Engineering spanning eight areas:

  1. Air Quality,
  2. Water Quality,
  3. Solid/Hazardous Waste,
  4. Ecological Engineering,
  5. Natural Resources Management,
  6. Environmental Systems,
  7. Environmental Informatics and
  8. Environmental Biotechnology.

Admission Requirements

Students must hold a minimum of a baccalaureate degree and an acceptable combination of GRE scores, TOEFL or IELTS score (international students) and grade point average. Students must submit a complete curriculum vitae, copies of transcripts from each institution of higher education attended, a statement of purpose describing their research interests, and three letters of recommendation from their academic or professional contacts. Applications will be considered on an individual basis. Contact the Doctoral Graduate Coordinator, Department of Environmental Engineering for details.

Graduate Committee

The student’s Advisory Committee will be comprised of at least four faculty members in addition to the research adviser. At least two of the members, in addition to the research adviser, must be from the Department of Environmental Engineering. The College of Graduate Studies will assign one additional non-voting faculty member, the Graduate College Representative (GCR).

Engineering, Ph.D.

Director of the Program: Dr. Mahesh Hosur
Contact: 361-593-4519

The Ph.D. program in Engineering is designed to ensure that a student has a good understanding of fundamental areas within their chosen specialization, while providing the student with in-depth knowledge in at least one area of their chosen specialization, and teaching the student the entire research process, such that he/she is capable of performing independent research. A graduate of the Ph.D. in Engineering program is perfectly poised to pursue a career in academia, a national lab, or industry, to work in research and development. The specializations currently offered include: 1) Chemical Engineering, 2) Civil Engineering, 3) Electrical Engineering, 4) Mechanical Engineering, and 5) Sustainable Energy Engineering.

Admission Requirements

Admission is highly competitive and decisions are based on the evaluation of multiple factors, including the need, capacity, and resources of the program. The general admission for the Ph.D. program in Engineering requires that applicants:

  • Must have earned a  master’s or bachelor’s degree in engineering or science
  • Must submit complete curriculum vitae, copies of transcripts from each institution of higher education attended, a statement of purpose describing their research interests, three letters of recommendation from their academic or professional contacts
  • Completed application along with payment of a nonrefundable application fee
  • Submit copies of the GRE scores, and TOEFL score for applicants whose native language is not English.

Specific requirements for Direct BS to Ph.D. Route

  • Must have BS degree in a specific discipline; students with BS in a related discipline (e.g., physics) should first obtain a MS degree before being admitted into the Ph.D. program
  • Must have faculty willing to advise the student; otherwise student is considered for admission into appropriate MS program
  • No minimum GPA or GRE (GRE is required for non-TAMUK students); if a faculty agrees to supervise and fund a student
  • A direct admit Ph.D. student (i.e., has a B.S. but not an M.S. degree) who has received any form of support from TAMUK (e.g., TA, RA, fellowship, etc.) is NOT allowed to switch to an M.S. degree without receiving written approval from his/her major advisor and Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Affairs

Wayne H. King Department of Chemical Engineering and Natural Gas Engineering

Department Faculty

Alexander, Matthew L Associate Professor, Wayne H. King Department of Chemical and Natural Gas Engineering; B.S., Trinity University; M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Purdue University.

Amaya, Joseph Visiting Assistant Professor, Wayne H. King Department of Chemical and Natural Gas Engineering; B.S., Texas A&M University-Kingsville; M.S., Texas A&M University-Kingsville; Ph.D., Texas A&M University-Kingsville.

Cabezas, Jose Professor of Practice, Wayne H. King Department of Chemical and Natural Gas Engineering; B.S., Escuela Superior Politécnica del Litoral (Ecuador); M.S., Texas A&M University-Kingsville; Ph.D., Texas A&M University-Kingsville.

Duarte, Horacio Associate Professor, Wayne H. King Department of Chemical and Natural Gas Engineering; B.S., Instituto Tecnologico Regional de Durango (Mexico); M.Eng., Instituto Tecnologico y de Estuidos Superiores de Monterrey (Mexico); Ph.D., Texas A&M University.

Fan, Zhaoqi Associate Professor, Wayne H. King Department of Chemical and Natural Gas Engineering; B.Sc., China University of Petroluem (China); Ph.D., China University of Petroluem (China); Ph.D., University of Regina (Canada).

Mills, Sr., Patrick Professor, Wayne H. King Department of Chemical and Natural Gas Engineering; B.S., Tri-State University; M.S., Washington University in St. Louis; D.Sc., Washington University in St. Louis.

Pilehvari, Ali Professor, Wayne H. King Department of Chemical and Natural Gas Engineering; Chair; B.S., Tehran Polytechnique (Iran); M.E., University of Tulsa; Ph.D., University of Tulsa.

Rahmani, Nazmul Professor of Practice, Wayne H. King Department of Chemical and Natural Gas Engineering; B.Sc., Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (Bangladesh); M.Sc., University of North Dakota; Ph.D., University of Alberta (Canada).

Xiao, Chongwei Associate Professor, Wayne H. King Department of Chemical and Natural Gas Engineering; B.A., Hubei University (China); M.E., Beijing Institute of Technology (China); Ph.D., University of Wyoming.

Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering

Department Faculty

Aguiniga, Francisco Professor, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering; B.S., University of Michoacan (Mexico); M.S., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Ph.D., Texas A&M University.

Al-Hamdan, Osama Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering; B.Sc., Jordan University of Science and Technology (Jordan); M.Sc., University of Alabama in Hunstville; Ph.D., University of Alabama in Hunstville.

Al-Qudah, Omar M Assistant Professor of Practice, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering; B.S., Mu'tah University (Jordan); M.S., Jordan University of Science and Technology (Jordan); Ph.D., The University of Texas at El Paso.

Bailey, Breanna Professor, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering; Chair; B.S., Texas A&M University; M.S., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Ph.D., Texas A&M University.

Choi, Jong-Won Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering; B.S., Korea University (South Korea); M.S., Georgia Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology.

Faruqi, Mohammed A Professor, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering; B.S.C.E., Texas A&I University; M.S.C.E., Texas A&I University; M.Eng., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., University of Arkansas.

Glusing, James Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering; B.Arch., University of Houston; M.Arch., University of Houston.

Hessami, Amir Assistant Professor, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering; B.S., Fedowsi University (India); M.S., Sharif University of Technology (Iran); Ph.D., Texas A&M University.

Liu, Xiaoyu Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering; B.S., Nanjing University of Science and Technology (China); M.S., Tongji University (China); Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Shen, Hui Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Architectural Engineering; B.S., East China Jiaotong University (China); M.S., Tongji University (China); Ph.D., Purdue University.

Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Department Faculty

Alam, Mohammad S Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; Special Assistant to the Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies; B.S., Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (Bangladesh); M.S., Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (Bangladesh); M.S., Wayne State University; Ph.D., University of Dayton.

Ammari, Habib M Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.S., Faculty of Sciences of Tunis (Tunisia); M.S., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington.

Challoo, Rajab Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.S., Wichita State University; M.S., Wichita State University; Ph.D., Wichita State University.

Fu, Xiangang Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.S., Ocean University of China (China); M.S., Ocean University of China (China); Ph.D., University of Alabama.

Girgis, Hani Zakaria Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.S., The State University of New York at Buffalo; M.S., The State University of New York at Buffalo; Ph.D., The State University of New York at Buffalo.

Goyal, Ayush Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.S., Boise State University; Ph.D., University of Oxford (United Kingdom).

Hicks, David Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.S., Angelo State University; M.C.S., Texas A&M University; Ph.D., Texas A&M University.

Khan, Maleq Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.S., Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (Bangladesh); M.S., North Dakota State University; Ph.D., Purdue University.

Kim, Taesic Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.S., Changwon National University (South Korea); M.S., University of Nebraska-Lincoln; Ph.D., University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Leung, Chung S Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.S., Florida Institute of Technology; M.S., Florida Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Florida Atlantic University.

McLauchlan, Lifford L Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.S., Texas A&I University; M.S., Texas A&I University; Ph.D., Texas A&M University.

Mishra, Avdesh Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.S., Tribhuvan University (Nepal); M.S., University of New Orleans; Ph.D., University of New Orleans.

Nekovei, A. Reza Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.S., University of Maine; M.S., University of Maine; Ph.D., University of Rhode Island.

Nijim, Mais Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.S., Princess Sumaya University for Technology (Jordan); M.S., New Mexico State University; Ph.D., New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology.

Noore, Afzel Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; Associate Dean for Undergraduate Affairs, Frank H. Dotterweich College of Engineering; Chair, Department of Industrial Management and Technology; B.E., University of Madras (India); M.S., Indian Institute of Technology (India); Ph.D., West Virginia University.

Park, Sung-won Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.E., Hanyang University (South Korea); M.E., Hanyang University (South Korea); M.S.E.E., University of New Mexico; Ph.D., University of New Mexico.

Smith, Scott Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; Chair; B.S., University of Missouri; B.S., University of Missouri; M.S., University of Missouri; Ph.D., University of Central Florida.

Toscano, George Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.S., Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (Bangladesh); M.S., Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (Bangladesh); Ph.D., University of Texas at Arlington.

Verma, Amit Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.Tech, Institute of Technology (India); M.S., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology.

Yilmaz, Muhittin Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.S., Gazi University (Turkey); M.Sc., Pennsylvania State University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University.

Yilmazer, Nuri Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.S., Cukurova University (Turkey); M.S., University of Florida; Ph.D., Syracuse University.

Zhang, Xuewei Associate Professor, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; B.S., Tsinghua University (China); M.S., Tsinghua University (China); Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Emeritus

Diersing, Robert Professor of Electrical Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineeirng and Computer Science; Interim Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies; B.B.A., Texas A&I University; M.S., Texas A&I University; M.B.A., Corpus Christi State University; Ph.D., Texas A&M University.

Department of Environmental Engineering

Department Faculty

Camacho, Lucy M Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Engineering; B.S., Technische Universitat Dresden (Germany); M.S., Technische Universitat Dresden (Germany); Ph.D., New Mexico State University.

Clapp, Lee Professor, Department of Environmental Engineering; B.S., University of Maine; M.S., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Rajib Bhuiyan, Mohammad Adnan Assistant Professor, Department of Environmental Engineering; B.S., Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (Bangladesh); M.S., Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (Bangladesh); Ph.D., Purdue University.

Ramirez, David Professor, Department of Environmental Engineering; Chair; B.S., Universidad Autonoma de Aguascalientes (Mexico); M.S., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign; Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Ren, Jianhong Professor, Department of Environmental Engineering; B.S., Beijing Polytechnic University (China); M.S., Drexel University; Ph.D., Northwestern University.

Sinha, Tushar Associate Professor, Department of Environmental Engineering; B.Engr., Maharana Pratap University of Agriculture and Technology (India); M.S., Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (India); Ph.D., Purdue University.

Department of Mechanical Engineering and Industrial Engineering

Department Faculty

Alam, Shah Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; B.S., Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (Bangladesh); M.S., Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology (Bangladesh); M.S., South Dakota School of Mines & Technology; Ph.D., Louisiana State University.

Bashetty, Srikanth Lecturer I, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; B.S., Jawaharlal Nehur Technological University (India); M.S., Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University (India); M.S., Texas A&M University-Kingsville; Ph.D., Texas A&M University-Kingsville.

Elkassabgi, Yousri Professor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; B.S., Alexandria University (Egypt); M.S., University of Waterloo (Canada); Ph.D., University of Houston.

Haik, Yousef Professor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; Chair; B.Sc., University of Jordan (Jordan); M.Sc., University of Iowa; Ph.D., Florida State University; J.D., Hamad Bin Khalifa University (Qatar).

He, Fei Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; B.S., Hunan University of Science and Technology (China); M.S., University of Rhode Island; Ph.D., The State University of New York.

Hossain, Mohammad Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; B.S., Chittagong University of Engineering and Technology (Bangladesh); M.S., Norther Carolina A&T State University; Ph.D., Texas A&M University.

Hosur, Mahesh Professor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; Associate Dean of Graduate Studies, Frank H. Dotterweich College of Engineering; B.Eng., Karnataka University (India); M.Tech., Indian Institute of Technology (India); Ph.D., Indian Institute of Science (India).

Isensee, Grady Lecturer I, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; B.S., Texas A&M University; M.S., Texas A&M University-Kingsville.

Jin, Kai Professor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; B.S., Nankai University (China); Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Khan, Ovais Visiting Assistant Professor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; B.S., The Nadirshaw Eduljee Dinshaw University of Engineering and Technology (Pakistan); M.S., King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals (Saudi Arabia); Ph.D., Wichita State University.

Lee, Sangsoo Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; B.En., Sogang University (South Korea); M.S., Sogang University (South Korea); Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology.

Li, Hua Professor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; B.Eng., Tsinghua University (China); Ph.D., Texas Tech University.

Mogiligidda, Rajashekar Lecturer I, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; B.Tech., Shanmugha Arts, Science, Technology, and Research Academy (India); M.S., Texas A&M University-Kingsville.

Oh, Joon-Yeoul Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; B.S., Chong-Ju University (South Korea); M.S., Chong-Ju University (South Korea); M.S., New Mexico State University; Ph.D., New Mexico State University.

Ozcelik, Selahattin Professor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; B.S., Technical University of Istanbul (Turkey); M.S., Texas A&I University; Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Peel, Larry D Professor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; B.S., Utah State University; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Ph.D., Brigham Young University.

Yang, Xue Associate Professor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; B.S., Tsinghua University (China); M.S., Tsinghua University (China); Ph.D., Purdue University.

Zhou, Hong Professor, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering; B.S., Northern Jiaotong University (China); M.S., Southeast University (China); Ph.D., Tennessee Technological University.

Engineering (PHEN)

Electrical Engineering (EEEN)

EEEN 6303  Spec Tops in Elec Engineering  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Courses offered under this Special Topics denomination concentrate on themes not present in the current EECS curriculum, or can also be offered to strengthen and provide further depth of study in important areas of electrical engineering. Topics vary to reflect new developments and interests on emerging areas of electrical engineering. May be repeated when topic changes.

EEEN 6306  Prop/Dissertation Research  9 SCH  (0-0-9)  

Students undertaking dissertation research towards fulfilling doctoral dissertation proposal and dissertation requirements are required to register for this course.

EEEN 6310  Intell. Control Optimization  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Artificial intelligence, Biomimicry, Fuzzy Logic, Neural Networks, Deep Learning, General Algorithms, and Expert Systems for Intelligent Control Systems and Optimization. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EEEN 6311  Nonlinear Systems  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Nonlinear systems and stability, linearization, phase plane analysis, describing functions, Lyapunov stability, feedback linearization, singular perturbations, model reduction, chaos control and sliding mode control. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing

EEEN 6383  Robust System Theory  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Signal and system norms, Structured and unstructured uncertainty, Robustness (stability and performance) analysis in time and frequency domains, Convex Optimization (Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMI), Semi-definite programming), Linear Fractional Transformations (LFT), H2 and H∞ and u controller designs, Youla parametrization, Linear parameter varying (PV) systems. Prerequisite: A Linear Systems Analysis Course.

EEEN 6385  Adaptive Array Systems  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Antenna Parameters, Terminology, Antenna Arrays, Spatial Filtering, Adaptive Antenna Arrays, Mutual Coupling & Correlation, Narrowband Array Systems (Beam Steering, Grating Lobes, Amplitude Weights), Adaptive Arrays (Spatial Covariance Matrix, Multi-beam Arrays, Scanning Arrays, Switched Beam Beamformers, Fully Adaptive Beamformers, Fourier Method, Capon's Minimum Variance, The MUSIC Algorithm, ESPRIT, Maximum Likelihood Techniques, Spatial Smoothing.

Environmental Engineering (EVEN)

EVEN 6102  Grad Sem in Environmental Engr  1 SCH  (0-1)  

Provides students with exposure to multidisciplinary opinions on current and future environmental issues from industrial, scientific, academic, governmental and engineering experts, in an environment that fosters productive exchange of ideas. Prerequisite: graduate standing in EVEN or related discipline. Credit/Noncredit.

EVEN 6301  Environ and Occupationl Health  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Overview of pertinent regulations and regulatory infrastructure. Development and application of the fundamental principles that determine environmental and occupational health. Discussion of methods for controlling environmental occupational hazards. Introduction to Environmental Health and Safety Information Systems.

EVEN 6304  Internship in Environ Enginrng  1-3 SCH  (1-3)  

Allows environmental engineering graduate students to participate in internships with industry, government and environmental consulting companies in career-based practical activities to broaden the skills obtained through curricular education. Attention will be given to select opportunities where the job training enhances the particular research needs of each student. Credit/Noncredit.

EVEN 6306  Proposal/Dissertation Research  1-3 SCH  (0-0-1-3)  

Students are allowed no more than 6 hours of registrations to complete a dissertation proposal.

EVEN 6308  Fundmnls Solid Hazardous Waste  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Overview of pertinent federal and state regulations. Fundamentals of solid/hazardous waste generation, management, treatment and disposal. Emphasis on the modeling aspects of the fate and transport of hazardous waste in the environment. Discussions of assessment planning, waste minimization, effective management of waste material and the application of treatment and disposal technologies.

EVEN 6309  Fund Air Qual and Polutn Contr  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Classification of air pollutants by the Clean Air Act and its amendments. Fundamental theories of air pollution and atmospheric science. Air pollution meteorology, atmospheric dispersion modeling and an introduction to air quality models. Control technology of gaseous air pollutants, process design variables applications.

EVEN 6311  Air Quality Modeling  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Physico-chemical process analysis of the atmosphere. Discussion of air quality models, types and applications. Development of an atmospheric chemical transport model for urban and regional scale applications. Performance evaluation and statistical assessment of air quality models. Stochastic modeling and analysis of air quality problems. Prerequisite: MATH 3320.

EVEN 6312  Sur Water Quality Modeling  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Ecological and human effects assessment; environmental decision criteria; monitoring strategies; environmental exposure assessment; development of pollutant transport, fate and persistence models; model parameter estimation. Prerequisites: MATH 3320.

EVEN 6313  Ground Water Contaminant  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Advanced topics in groundwater flow problems and contaminant transport modeling, including groundwater transport model selection, initialization and calibration with an emphasis on model application to regional water resources protection and planning. Prerequisites: MATH 3320.

EVEN 6316  Fundamentls of Environ Biotech  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Overview of microbiology fundamentals and development of quantitative tools for describing stoichiometry, microbial energetics, microbial kinetics, biofilm kinetics and bioreactor mass balances. Application of these tools for designing processes for treating solid, liquid and gas phase pollutants, including solid waste composting, wastewater treatment, sludge digestion, bioremediation and air biofiltration. Analysis of complex biological systems involving dynamic multispecies interactions.

EVEN 6318  Enviro System Modeling  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Designed to introduce the basic approaches for modeling environmental systems. Impacts from anthropogenic activities to the environment will be systematically evaluated via the use of various simulation approaches. Case studies in understanding complex environmental systems will be incorporated to enhance the integrated skills available for model synthesis via multidisciplinary analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 3320.

EVEN 6319  Chem Prin of Envir Eng Design  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Discussions and applications of chemical principles in disinfection, air pollution, geochemistry and aquatic, microbial, redox and coagulation chemistry in systems design for environmental engineering. Introduction to chemical computer models for environmental applications. An overview of the biogeochemistry of natural water systems and the chemistry of the atmosphere.

EVEN 6325  Physical-Chem Water Treatment  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Overview of the theory and mechanisms governing physical and chemical water treatment processes. Application of chemical and physical process theory to the practical design of systems for water and wastewater treatment and residuals management. Basic design features of the treatment systems are presented, with an emphasis on the underlying principles. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

EVEN 6329  Environ Monitor and Measurmnts  3 SCH  (1-3)  

An integrated experience in developing and designing laboratory experiments and field sampling campaigns, acquiring and analyzing high quality data for understanding environmental phenomena and presenting experimental results using state-of-the-art communication tools. Emphasis is also on project-oriented, team-based projects that promote collaborative learning.

EVEN 6332  Environmental Data Analysis  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Topics concerning the unique characteristics of environmental data, the process of statistical characterization, the identification of system changes, the usefulness of non-parametric approaches and the utilization of data in characterizing risk and the determination of acceptable environmental cleanup standards to manage risk. Prerequisites: MATH 3320.

EVEN 6340  Decision Sci for Environ Systm  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Provides the fundamentals of decision science theory in support of large-scale complex environmental systems analysis. Discussions and lectures will cover the realm of multi-criteria decision-making. The basics of multi-attribute decision-making and multi-objective stochastic programming, gray programming, fuzzy programming and their combinations will be emphasized.

EVEN 6341  Enviromental Informatics  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Introduction to environmental data types and structures. Discussion of database design and tools, data warehousing: environmental information management using Geographic Information Systems (GIS), theory and environmental application of remote-sensing technologies; environmental knowledge management and decision support using knowledge-based systems.

EVEN 6342  Enginerng Optimzatn Envron Sys  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Provides the fundamentals of optimization theories and their real world application potential for environmental systems planning and pollution control. Class discussions of fundamental operational research techniques cover linear programming, integer programming, dynamic programming and nonlinear programming. Case studies are designed to deal with the typical planning, design and operation problems for environmental infrastructure systems with regard to complex multidisciplinary decision-making.

EVEN 6354  Enviromental Regs&Policy  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Overview of federal and state regulations and international agreements for the protection of human and environmental health. Legal, social, political and economic patterns and processes, which set the stage for the development of environmental policy. Impacts and interactions of environmental regulation and policy on the design and implementation of environmental management systems in the public and private sectors. Discussion of environmental ethics and interactions with the environmental engineering profession and with the formulation of environmental regulations and policy.

EVEN 6356  Spec Top in Environ Enginerng  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Courses offered under this Special Topics denomination concentrate on themes not present in the current EVEN curriculum, or can also be offered to strengthen and provide further depth of study in important areas of environmental engineering. Topics vary to reflect new developments and interests on emerging areas of environmental engineering. May be repeated when topic changes.

Mechanical Engineering (MEEN)

MEEN 6303  Special Topics Mechanical Eng  3 SCH  (3-0)  

One or more advanced topics to strengthen and provide further depth of study in important areas of Mechanical Engineering. May be repeated when topic changes.

MEEN 6306  Proposal/Dissertation Research  1-9 SCH  (0-0-1-9)  

This course is for doctoral students undertaking dissertation research to take towards fulfilling doctoral dissertation proposal and dissertation requirements.

MEEN 6321  Adv Eng Data Analysis & Opt  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Data collection and random sampling methods for engineering applications, advanced probability and data analysis for engineering problems, linear and non-linear regressions including multi-variable regression, and heuristic optimization algorithms.

MEEN 6325  Analytical Dynamics  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Generalized coordinates and forces. Hamilton's principle and equations. Quasi-coordinates and quasi-velocities. Gibbs-Appeal equations. Kane's equations. Stability of nonlinear dynamic systems. Analyses of nonlinear dynamic systems. Prerequisite: engineering graduate student.

MEEN 6326  Advanced Control Systems  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Input-output and state space representation of linear continuous and discrete time dynamic systems. Controllability, observability, and Lyapunov stability. Design and analysis of single and multi-variable feedback control systems. State observer, linear quadratic optimum control, linear robust control. Application to engineering system.

MEEN 6327  Nonlinear Solid Mechanics  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Constitutive equations for nonlinear behaviors of solids. Nonlinear strains and stresses of solids. Material and geometric nonlinearities of solids. Nonlinear deformation, buckling and stability analyses of bars, frames, plates and shells. Prerequisite: engineering graduate student.

MEEN 6331  Advanced Polymer Science  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Structure and properties of polymeric materials, polymer-solvent thermodynamics, physical and mechanical properties such as viscosity, glass transition, viscoelasticity, rheology, fatigue, creep, toughening principles. Prerequisite: graduate standing in science or engineering with materials science (MEEN 3344) or equivalent course taken in undergraduate study.

MEEN 6332  Adv Mech Composites & Design  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Lamina Stress-Strain Relationships, Effective Moduli and Strength of a Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Lamina, Hygrothermal Behavior, Analysis of Laminates, and Selection of Laminate Designs. Prerequisite: graduate standing in science or engineering with strength of materials (CEEN 3311) or equivalent course taken in undergraduate study.

MEEN 6333  Nondestructive Evaluation Tech  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Importance of NDE in engineering design, manufacturing, maintenance and service, principles of NDE techniques such as penetrant, ultrasonics, Acoustic Emission, Magnetic Particle, and eddy current testing, emerging technologies in the field of NDE. Prerequisite: graduate standing in science or engineering.

Sustainable Energy Systems Engineering (ESEN)

ESEN 6102  Seminar in ESEN  1 SCH  (1-0)  

Exposure to multidisciplinary options on current and future issues on Sustainable Energy Systems from industrial, scientific, academic, governmental and engineering experts, in an environment that fosters productive exchange of ideas. Credit/Noncredit. Prerequisite: Graduate Standing.

ESEN 6303  Adv T: Sustainable Energy Syst  3 SCH  (3-0)  

One or more advanced topics. May be repeated when topic changes.

ESEN 6306  Proposal/Dissertation  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Proposal. The abstract and signature page of the proposal should be filed with the Office of Graduate Studies upon successful defense by the student and approval of the document by the dissertation committee. Dissertation Defense. Student must successfully defend a dissertation. A quorum of the members of the dissertation committee is required for the defense. The Graduate Council Representative must be in attendance for the defense. Dissertation. A candidate must complete a dissertation which is acceptable to the student's advisory committee and the Dean of the Graduate Studies. To be acceptable, the dissertation must give evidence that the candidate has pursued a program of research, the result of which reveals superior academic competence and a significant contribution to knowledge.

ESEN 6310  Sust Energy Sys & Policy  3 SCH  (3-0)  

An overview of existing and upcoming renewable energy technologies. Fundamentals of energy generation in each approach ae presented in detail. Assessment of technologies is attained based on comparative sustainability. Evaluation of energy generation technologies is established via life cycle assessment of climate change impact. Trends and probable future energy scenarios are discussed.

ESEN 6311  Fund Pow Gen & Energy Storage  3 SCH  (3)  

Updated power generation and storage technologies. Design and evaluation of various types of power generation, storage systems, and its components using fundamentals of interdisciplinary engineering principles and a software. Prerequisites: MEEN 5321 and MEEN 5347.

ESEN 6312  Energy Sys Integ & Design  3 SCH  (3-0)  

A unique system-of-systems concept to energy systems integration. The relationships among electricity, thermal, and fuel systems and data and information networks to ensure optimal integration and interoperability across the entire energy system spectrum. Prerequisites: Gradute Standing.

ESEN 6313  Adv Eng Math  3 SCH  (3)  

Foundation of calculus, Stochastic processes, Fundamentals of Mathematical Analysis, Optimization principles. Prerequisites: 5000 level Math Course or instructor approval.

ESEN 6321  Smart Grids  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Fundamentals of smart power grids, technology advances in transmission and distribution systems, policy drivers, assets and demand management, and smart grid security. Prerequisites: graduate standing and approval from instructor.

ESEN 6325  Solar Power  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Traditional solar cell architectures, 1st and 2nd generation solar cells, nanotubes and nanowires based solar cells, thin-film organic conjugates solar cells, CIGS solar cells, plasmonic effects and light trapping. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ESEN 6326  Characterization of Materials  3 SCH  (3-0)  

This course on materials characterization techniques is designed to help engineers and scientists who have little background in materials analysis to realize the abundance of analytical methods available to provide information about their components. Characterization describes those features of composition and structure of materials that are significant for a particular preparation, study of properties or use, and suffice for reproduction of the material. The topics covered are vacuum theory, imaging techniques, vibration spectroscopy, electron emission spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, techniques for characterization of thermal, mechanical and electrical properties. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree in engineering or physical sciences.

ESEN 6328  Nanofab & Nanoscale Dev  3 SCH  (3-0)  

This course is designed to give students experience in nanofabrication methods such as thin film disposition, ethcing and lithography to manipulate a wide variety of materials including dielectrics, semiconductors, organics, polymers, metallic materials and molecular films. In addition, this course will introduce MEMS/NEMS and CMOS devices. Prerequisite: Undergraduate degree in engineering or physical sciences.

ESEN 6329  Adv T: Multiphysics Modelling  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Review of the macroscopic and microscopic transport laws and conservation principles that occur in the analysis of sustainable engineering systems involving multiscale and multiphysics phenomena. Methods for constructing models that involve coupling between electrical, mechanical, fluid flow, energy transport and species transport are presented through various examples and case studies. The efficient utilization of modern software tools to generate solutions, such as MATLAB and COMSOL Multiphysics, will extensively be taught along with the underlying mathematical and computational science. Graduate standing in engineering or permission of the instructor is required.

ESEN 6331  Thermal Systems Engineering  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Understanding of the general theory of designing thermal systems. The dynamics and factors affecting the design of thermal systems. Prerequisites: MEEN 3347 and MEEN 3392.

ESEN 6333  Advanced Wind Farm Design  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Advanced knowledge of wind farm design, development, and operation, including wind power estimation, wake flow effect, wind turbine selection, location selection, and layout optimization.

ESEN 6334  Energy Resource Mngmnt & Optim  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Advanced knowledge related to energy resource management and optimization. Different types of energy resources, including petroleum and natural gas, electricity, and renewable energy. Comprehensive real world examples to describe various optimization problems, risk and logistics management, and regulations. The latest policy initiatives and recent trends in energy resource management. Prerequisites: graduate standing and approval from instructor.

ESEN 6335  Wind Power  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Basics of Wind Energy and Power, Kinetic Energy of Wind, Properties of Wind, Statistical Distribution of Wind Speed, Wind Measurement and Sensors, Deploying Wind Turbines in Grid, Environmental Impact of Wind Turbines, Wind Classes, Shear, Operation and Control. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ESEN 6341  Advanced Chemical Kinetics  3 SCH  (3-0)  

Theory and applications of the principles of reaction kinetics to reactions involving substances in the gaseous, liquid, or solid state with an emphasis on those that occur in the energy sciences and sustainable reacting systems. Reactions catalyzed by organo-metallic complexes or solid heterogeneous catalysts and the analysis of transport-kinetic interactions for multiphase fluid-fluid and fluid-solid systems. Experimental techniques for measurement of reaction rates for both single phase and multiphase reaction environments. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

Environmental Engineering, Ph.D.

Coursework

Core Courses: Fundamentals of Solid and Hazardous Waste, Chemical Principles for Environmental Engineering Design, Physical-Chemical Water Treatment Processes, Fundamentals of Air Quality and Pollution Control, Fundamentals of Environmental Biotechnology, Environmental Data Analysis.

Research in Environmental Engineering, Environmental Engineering Graduate Seminar

Elective Courses: Environmental Monitoring and Measurements, Environmental Regulations and Policy, Environmental and Occupational Health, Air Quality Modeling, Surface Water Quality Modeling, Groundwater Contaminant Transport Modeling, Ecosystem Modeling, Environmental Systems Modeling, Environmental Risk Assessment and Risk Management, Ecological Engineering, Industrial Ecology, Decision Sciences for Environmental Systems, Environmental Systems Engineering, Environmental Management Systems, Environmental Exposure Assessment, and other special topics.

Initial Degree Plan

The student must file an initial degree plan with the Graduate Dean within one semester of being admitted to the Ph.D. program in Environmental Engineering. The PhD degree plan must include 24 to 36 credits of coursework, 6 credit hours of graduate seminar, and 21 to 33 credit hours of research.

Normal Course Load

A full-time status course load is 9 credit hours during the fall or spring semesters, and 3 credit hours each summer. For students at the dissertation stage who have completed all required coursework, enrollment in Research/Dissertation (EVEN 6306) constitutes full load.

Research Credits

Research credits (EVEN 6306) counted towards the doctoral degree plan must be associated with documented achievements, the first being successful completion of the doctoral qualifying exam. Letter grades ("A", "B", etc.) in EVEN 6306 will be assigned only for the research proposal and for the dissertation defense; all other research credits used for the final degree plan will be assigned a grade of "CR".  Students who make satisfactory research progress during a semester, but without documented achievements will be assigned a grade of "S", while students making unsatisfactory progress will be assigned a grade of "U". Examples of documented achievements include, but are not limited to, the development of a new research methodology, research-related presentations at professional conferences, and publication of research in peer-reviewed journals.

Course Longevity

A student must complete all requirements for the doctoral degree, including the dissertation, within ten consecutive years of initial registration. Graduate credits older than ten years are not applicable toward a doctoral degree without written permission of the Graduate Dean.

All doctoral course work (including the dissertation) will be satisfactorily completed by the doctoral student in a maximum of 99 semester credit hours. If the Graduate Dean approves in writing that a student may proceed beyond the 99 credit hour limit, the student will be assessed out-of-state tuition.

Qualifying Examination

The student must successfully complete a qualifying examination after completing 15 credit hours of course work and before completing the first 30 credit hours applicable toward the Ph.D. degree, as defined in the initial degree plan. The qualifying exam will be formulated by the faculty in the Department of Environmental Engineering with the purpose of evaluating the student’s grasp of the fundamental topics considered necessary for the successful completion of a Ph.D. in Environmental Engineering. Students failing to pass the qualifying exam may be denied candidacy. Recommendations will be made to students passing the qualifying exam concerning modifications to the initial degree plan to fill identified knowledge gaps. The students must complete their dissertation proposal within the first 45 hours of their doctoral study.

Admission to Candidacy

The student must apply for candidacy in the Ph.D. program in Environmental Engineering within 45 hours of completion applicable to the Ph.D. degree as defined in their initial degree plan. Admission to candidacy requires:

  • Successful completion of the qualifying exam
  • Selection of a Research Adviser
  • Selection of an Advisory Committee
  • Filing of a final degree plan

Dissertation Proposal

After passing the doctoral qualifying exam, PhD candidates are required to develop a 15-page research proposal following the general format guidelines of a federal funding agency (e.g., the National Science Foundation). PhD candidates must defend the research proposal within one year after passing the doctoral qualifying exam.

Dissertation

All candidates will be required to conduct an original scientific or engineering investigation that will become the basis for the Ph.D. dissertation. The student’s graduate committee and the graduate dean must approve the dissertation.

Completion

The degree “Doctor of Philosophy” will be conferred on students after:

  • Being admitted to candidacy.
  • Maintaining (for all courses identified on their final degree plan as being applicable and non-foundation or leveling, to the Ph.D. degree) a minimum grade of “C” in each course and a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better on a scale of 4.0.
  • Completing 21 to 33 credits of research (EVEN 6306) with grades of "A", "B", or "CR".   
  • Successfully defending the dissertation in the presence of the Research Adviser, Advisory Committee and the Graduate College Representative.

Engineering, Ph.D.

Coursework

  • A direct admit PhD student is required to take 93 total credits, including at least 42 credits of didactic coursework
  • A total of 63 credits to meet the graduation requirements
  • A total of 6 credits of required didactic courses: 1) Advanced Engineering Math, and 2) Seminar and Research Integrity, which are 3 credits each
  • A minimum 18 credits of didactic 6xxx coursework, which includes the above 6 credits
  • A minimum of 30 credits of dissertation
  • The remaining 15 credits can be a combination of additional coursework, dissertation or summer internships
  • 5xxx courses can be taken for additional coursework
  • Summer internship earned at 1 credit/internship are limited to 3 credits

A full-time status course load is nine-semester credit hours during the fall or spring semesters and three-semester credit hours during each summer session. For students at the dissertation stage, enrollment in Research/Dissertation Writing courses constitutes a full load.

Transfer Credits

The student’s Advisory Committee may recommend transfer of up to a maximum of 12 credits for graduate courses taken by the student at any other institution. Transfer credits may be recommended under both core and elective categories. These courses must not be a part of the requirements of a prior degree earned and should have a grade of B and above.

Initial Degree Plan

The student must file an initial degree plan with the Graduate Dean within one semester of being admitted to the Ph.D. program in Engineering.

Advisory Committee

During the first year of his/her study in the Ph.D. program, the student and his/her Major Professor must recommend to the Director of the program the student’s Advisory Committee consisting of a minimum of five members including the Major Professor. The Advisory Committee shall also serve as the Examination Committee.

Course Longevity

A student must complete all requirements for the doctoral degree, including the dissertation, within ten consecutive years of initial registration. Graduate credits older than ten years are not applicable toward a doctoral degree without the written permission of the Graduate Dean.

All doctoral course work (including the dissertation) will be satisfactorily completed by the doctoral student in a maximum of 99 semester credit hours. If the Graduate Dean approves in writing that a student may proceed beyond the 99 credit hour limit, the student will be assessed out-of-state tuition.

Qualifying Examination

The purpose of the qualifying exam (QE) is to ensure that the Ph.D. student has sufficient knowledge in at least 4 fundamental areas in the specific discipline. The written QE will be administered based on the undergraduate courses (listed below for each specialization), and is offered once per year in the middle of the Fall semester (normally late September or October). 

All Ph.D. students are required to take the QE in the subsequent Fall semester after starting the Ph.D. program, and pass all portions of the exam before the next Fall semester, in order to be eligible for continued support from the department or college (e.g., TA or fellowship); RA funding is at the discretion of the grant Principal Investigator. For example, if a student started at TAMUK in Fall 2019 or Spring 2020, the student must take the QE in Fall 2020, and either pass all 4 sections of the QE with at least a 70%, or pass (with an A or B) the corresponding undergraduate/graduate course(s) for sections failed before Fall 2021. The appropriate corresponding course is determined by the department administering the section of the QE that the student failed.

If a student skips taking the QE in Fall 2020, the student will not be eligible for TA/fellowship support in Spring 2021 or thereafter until the student satisfies all QE requirements. If a student takes the QE in Fall 2020, but fails one or more sections, the student will still be eligible for TA/grader support in Spring 2021, but will only be eligible for TA/grader support in Fall 2021 if the student passes (with an A or B) all corresponding course(s) for sections the student failed before Fall 2021.

The Ph.D. qualifying exam consists of four 2-hour written exams covering fundamental discipline-specific material in 4 areas, selected by the student, with approval from his/her major advisor. Suggested subjects for qualifiers for different specializations are listed below.

Chemical Engineering Specialization

  • Biochemical Engineering
  • Chemical Process Design
  • Chemical Reactor Engineering
  • Conservation Principles
  • Fluid Transport Phenomena
  • }Heat transport Phenomena
  • }Mass Transport Phenomena
  • Natural Gas Process
  • Process Dynamics and Control
  • Process Simulation
  • Thermodynamics
  • Unit Operations

Civil Engineering Specialization

  • Construction Materials
  • Environmental Engineering
  • Geotechnical Engineering
  • Hydraulics and Fluid Mechanics
  • Hydrology
  • Mechanics of Composites
  • Reinforced Concrete Design
  • Statics and Dynamics
  • Strength of Materials
  • Structural Analysis
  • Structural Steel Design
  • Surveying
  • Transportation Engineering

Electrical Engineering Specialization

  • Applied Electromagnetics
  • Circuits I
  • Computer Networks
  • Data Structures and Algorithms
  • Digital Design
  • Electronics Embedded Systems: non-processor specific assembly and C language programming
  • Operating Systems
  • Random Signals
  • Signals & Systems
  • Software Engineering I

Mechanical Engineering Specialization

  • Aerodynamics
  • Aerospace Structures
  • Dynamics
  • Engineering Design and Simulation
  • Engineering Vibrations
  • Fluid Mechanics
  • Heat Transfer
  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • IC engines
  • Machine Design
  • Materials Science
  • Mechanics of Composites
  • Nuclear Engineering
  • Operations Research
  • Polymer Science and Engineering
  • Robotics
  • Statics
  • Strength of Materials
  • Supply Chain Management
  • Thermodynamics

Sustainable Energy Engineering Specialization

Select any combination of 4 of the above specialization areas.

In exceptional cases, advisors need to work with the director of the PhD program to choose subjects that are not in this list.

To pass, the student must achieve a score of 70% or above on each of the 4 chosen exams. If a student does not pass one or more exam(s), the student must take the corresponding undergraduate class(es) the next time offered and pass the course(s) with a grade of A or B. Note that undergraduate courses may not be covered by a student’s tuition waiver; therefore, the student may be required to pay to take an undergraduate course him/herself. Failure to pass the Ph.D. qualifying exam will result in the dismissal of the student from the program.

Seminars

A student pursuing the Ph.D. in Engineering degree is required to present at least one seminar each year during his/her course of study. The final seminar shall be his/her Final Oral Examination for the degree. The student is required to attend all seminars scheduled by the department.

Admission to Candidacy

The student must apply for candidacy in the Ph.D. in Engineering program within 45 credit hours of completion applicable to the Ph.D. degree as defined in their initial degree plan. Admission to candidacy requires:

  • Successful completion of the qualifying exam
  • Selection of a Research Adviser
  • Selection of an Advisory Committee
  • Filing of a final degree plan
  • Submission and successful defense of a dissertation proposal

Candidacy Examination

The purpose of the candidacy exam is to ensure that the student a has sufficient understanding of the technical literature in his/her field, and has formulated a research topic and plan that is sufficient for earning the Engineering Ph.D. degree. The candidacy exam consists of a written
(15 page max) and oral (approximately 30 minutes plus questions) proposal for his/her Ph.D. research, which is evaluated by his/her advisory committee. This research proposal should include:

  • Objective of the student’s work or the hypothesis he/she wishes to investigate
  • Explanation of why this topic is significant
  • Explanation of what others have done in the area
  • Explanation of how the student proposes to attack this problem
  • Preliminary results, and submitted, accepted, and published papers, if any
  • Expected results and implications

The written proposal must be given to the advisory committee at least 7 days before the oral exam. A student must pass the qualifying exam before taking the candidacy exam. The candidacy exam is typically taken after most courses have been completed. It is strongly suggested that the student take the candidacy examination at least one year prior to the dissertation defense.

Permission to schedule the oral examination must be requested of the Graduate School by the student’s major adviser using the Request to Schedule Examination form. The request to schedule must be received by the Graduate School at least two (2) weeks prior to the examination. Notification by the Graduate School will confirm the scheduled examination. After passing both the qualifying exam and candidacy exam (together referred to as the comprehensive/preliminary exam by the graduate school), the student advances to Ph.D. candidacy.

Dissertation

All candidates will be required to conduct an original scientific or engineering investigation that will become the basis for the Ph.D. dissertation. The student’s graduate committee and the graduate dean must approve the dissertation.

Dissertation Defense

  • The candidate must pass a final oral examination before being awarded the Ph.D. degree. The advisory committee shall serve as the examining committee of which the major adviser serves as chair. Any substitutions must be approved by the Dean of the Graduate Studies.
  • The final examination shall cover the dissertation and knowledge fundamental thereto. Permission to schedule the final examination must be requested of the Office of the Graduate Studies by the student’s major adviser using the Request to Schedule Examination form. The Office of the Graduate Studies must receive the request to schedule at least two (2) weeks prior to the examination. Notification by the Office of the Graduate Studies will confirm the scheduled examination.
  • The dissertation in a near-final form must be given to the committee members no fewer than seven (7) days prior to the examination. If this seven (7) day stipulation cannot be met, the student must either secure the concurrence of all committee members or reschedule the examination. At the conclusion of the examination, the examining committee shall record, in writing, approval or disapproval. The Report of the Final Exam must be filed with the Office of the Graduate Studies within seven (7) days of the exam.
  • Continuous enrollment is required until all degree requirements are completed, including submitting final copies of the dissertation. 

Publication Requirement

It is strongly recommended that all doctoral students have at least one paper accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal prior to receiving their Ph.D. degree. Choice of acceptable journals is up to the student’s major advisor and advisory committee.

Completion

  • The degree “Doctor of Philosophy” will be conferred on those students who:
  • Complete required coursework
  • Are admitted to candidacy
  • Maintain (for all courses identified on their final degree plan as being applicable and non-foundation or leveling, to the Ph.D. degree) a minimum grade of “C” in each course and a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better on a scale of 4.0
  • Successfully defend the dissertation in the presence of the Research Advisor, Advisory Committee and the Graduate College Representative

Submission Requirements

Student and the major advisor are responsible for getting the necessary signatures and submission of all the forms and documents needed to the Office of Graduate Studies at all stages of the student’s tenure at TAMUK. These include, but are not limited to:

  • Qualifying examination report form
  • Dissertation proposal submission form
  • Signature page
  • Dissertation status report form documenting dissertation defense
  • Copyright form
  • Plagiarism check report (e.g., TurnItIn report)
  • Dissertation submission file upload form

For the latest requirements, refer to the Graduate Studies Home page.